23 Reasons Why You Need To Encourage Kids To Read

Do you want your kids to grow up in front of constantly moving, noisy and flashing lights bombing their senses, which, quite frankly, are very stressful on the brains? Switch off that television set and unplug the Wi-Fi connection, despite of all the crying and nagging from your children that you may have to bear. Its time you inculcate more rewarding habits in your child.

As parents, we all want our kids to develop healthy traits. We want them to become astronauts, doctors, or join the military to serve their country. In short, we want to see them succeed. Just because you have spent a lot of time choosing the best school trying to ensure your child gets quality education, doesn’t mean your job is done just yet. As a parent, if you want your children to be bright and smart, encourage traits like reading in them.

To help emphasize this point, we have compiled 23 quotes/psychology-baked reasons why you should be encouraging your kids to read at an early stage. After reading this, we certainly hope that, as a parent, you will understand the power and importance of literacy in a child’s life when their young minds are developing as if on steroids.

Expansion of Vocabulary

Expansion of Vocabulary

“To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark.” ~Victor Hugo

Reading expands our vocabulary, there’s no denying that. Even as adults, when we read, we come across many new words we never really heard of. So imagine the impact on the minds of your little angels when they learn of words ahead of their age in their developmental stages. You must be picturing your kid as a prodigy right now, aren’t you? Well, you never know; they might become one. Reading is an exercise.

It is no secret that most kids struggle with pronunciation of words when growing up. As parents, we typically don’t worry about this much, thinking their pronunciation and fluency of words will get better over time. For many, it does happen, but for some, it never does. If you want to improve the fluency and comprehension of words in your child’s mind, do it from an early stage so that they develop it as a habit. Once they do, believe us, this will be the best gift you could have given him.

Parents who make it a habit to encourage reading abilities in their child early on often feel less stressed in the elementary years of their child since they have already accomplished much of it before their time. Reading is an exercise for the mind. It helps kids calm down and relax, opening doors of new knowledge to enlighten their minds. Kids who read grow up to have better cognitive skills.

Better Comprehension

Better Comprehension

“Reading is important, because if you can read, you can learn anything about everything and everything about anything.” ~Tomie de Paola

Kids who are encouraged to read at an early age have better comprehension of things around them. They develop smart thinking abilities and are more receptive to creativity and ideas that other kids their age lack. As a result, they grow up to be a good deal more intelligent and aware of their surroundings than kids who don’t read.

We’ll let you in on a little secret – Vivian Leigh, who turned about to be the famous Scarlet O’Hara, had a nearly photographic memory. As a child, her mother used to encourage games and reading activities that helped develop her cognitive understanding of things to the degree that she hardly had any difficulty memorizing things upon growing up. Reading doesn’t only have to be through books. Healthy habits of reading can also be encouraged via learning of languages and sentence related games, sign boards etc.

Early Reading makes for a better Future and Academic Growth

Early Reading makes for a better Future and Academic Growth

“So it is with children who learn to read fluently and well: They begin to take flight into whole new worlds as effortlessly as young birds take to the sky.” ~William James

For those who haven’t read the evidence-baked research study “What Reading does for the Mind” by Cunningham and Stanovich, well, you’re doing yourself a disservice. Go read it! Findings from the study suggest that, when children are introduced to the habit of reading at an early stage, they aim for a better academic growth and promising future. But don’t take this as the only component to becoming successful; there are hundreds, but they all start with better comprehension of things, an ability that can be refined via reading, especially as a child.

Once you allow your mind to open up and respond to what the world has for you and strive to grasp as much as you can, believe us, you are prepping yourself for success and a content mind, free from all shackles of worries.

More reading Equals a Polished Personality

More reading Equals a Polished Personality

“It is not enough to simply teach children to read; we have to give them something worth reading. Something that will stretch their imaginations—something that will help them make sense of their own lives and encourage them to reach out toward people whose lives are quite different from their own.” ~Katherine Patterson

What constitutes a polished personality? The core elements include a positive attitude, self-satisfaction, a degree of selflessness, and of course, morals and ethics. Teaching your child all these traits via giving them relevant books to read will surely help in building up a polished personality. To develop a polished personality where they feel confident of themselves and don’t fall victim to self-consciousness, it is better that you give them the gift of books that highlight positive aspects instead of negative ones.

Mathew’s Effect of Reading

Mathew’s Effect of Reading

There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book. ~Frank Serafini

Some of you might already be aware of this one. For the rest of us, Mathew’s effect of reading refers to a very simple yet profound prodigy: “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.” Metaphorically speaking, kids who read get richer in terms of vocabulary, fluency and comprehension, whereas kids who don’t fall into the pit of poverty.

Reading builds confidence

Reading builds confidence

“Literacy is a bridge from misery to hope.” ~Kofi Annan

In a world where competition in every walk of life prevails, we need to build a child’s personality as to have considerable confidence in themselves. Kids who lack confidence in their early stages often grow up to be shy, and at times suicidal, since they develop a victim mentality owing to the lack of confidence in their own self. They find it hard to face even the smallest of challenges life throws at them, instead simply giving up.

Understanding of the world

Understanding of the world

“It is books that are the key to the wide world; if you can’t do anything else, read all that you can.” ~Jane Hamilton

Reading takes us where our feet can’t, or at least our pockets can’t. It’s a great feeling, isn’t it? Let your kids experience the same. Gift them books that speak of cultures, people around them, and whatever there is out there in the world waiting to be discovered and you will see before your eyes a kid who grows up to be smart and aware of his surroundings and his importance and role in this world.

Better comprehension of safety signs

Better comprehension of safety signs

“Reading should not be presented to children as a chore or duty. It should be offered to them as a precious gift.” ~Kate DiCamillo

This is not an option or a choice. As a parent, make it your foremost priority. Teaching children safety signs such as “stop”, “beware of dogs”, “danger”, keep out”, etc. As adults, it’s really hard to keep an eye on our kids 24/7 with our busy routines and schedules. Parents who know that their kids know of all these safety measures might engage in their work with more concentration than the ones who don’t. So, reading to your kids or encouraging them to read of these signs at an early age will only keep them safe. Isn’t that, as parents, one of our primary goals?

Kids who read do better at school

Kids who read do better at school

“Read. Everything you can get your hands on. Read until words become your friends. Then when you need to find one, they will jump into your mind, waving their hands for you to pick them. And you can select whichever you like, just like a captain choosing a stickball team.” ~Karen Witemeyer

Kids who indulge in reading book and learning new things do better at school. They are more creative, open to new ideas, and develop empathy for others. For instance, kids who read about heroes idolize them, kids who love reading anatomy books dream of becoming a doctor, etc. They learn to empathize with characters in the books and want to be like them. Not only that, they learn valuable life lessons such as helping others and being kind. Moral codes such as goods things will be appreciated and evils punished take root in their minds too, as a result of which they learn to stay away from trouble.

It improves writing skills in children

It improves writing skills in children

Kids who learn to read also tend to develop better writing skills. The reason: they have been introduced to a world where words are their main weapon and they are free to shoot out. Literally! Parents must try to develop an interest for writing. Kids with good writing skills don’t fall victim to cramming and can express themselves more candidly through their words.

Reading makes a kid smarter

Reading makes a kid smarter

“To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled is a spark.” ~Victor Hugo

We have already talked about kids who read doing better at school, but one much more important benefit of reading is that it sharpens our minds. Kids who read distinguish between good and bad, right and wrong, much better than kids who don’t. Why is that important? We present the evidence with the support of a 1988 research by Haynes and Ahrens.

The study tried to study the very core hypothesis: was reading making kids smarter? If yes, how? Both the researchers believed that a person’s bulk of vocabulary grows as a result of what he reads rather than converse or hear. Oral language is a key factor in our understanding and development, but it is not as essential or influential as reading is. Children books, they added, had a far rarer set of words than on TV, cartoons or even in regular conversation. According to them, a children’s book had a three times higher occurrence of rare words and sentences than in adult conversations. So yes, reading makes for a smarter kid!

 

It broadens horizons and improves outlook on life

It broadens horizons and improves outlook on life

“Reading is a discount ticket to everywhere.” ~ Mary Schmich

It broadens our horizons and outlook of the world, allowing one a window into different places, people, cultures, and traditions that we might have never known if it weren’t for books. When we open a book while sitting in the comfort of our rooms, like time travelling, we transport our imaginations to a world purely based on the imaginations of the author. We learn about everything they wants u to know, see the world through their eyes and their perspective, learn about new people, discover their traditions, cultures and all that makes them unique and unforgettable. We begin to relate to them, refer to them in our conversations, and often go back for inspiration. The same are the wonders of a good book for our little ones.

Books are great de-stressors

Books are great de-stressors

“In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you.”~ Mortimer J. Adler

Believe it or not, but they are. All great people agree that they find solace and relaxation when reading a good book. According to many researches and studies, kids who are unable to live a normal, healthy life due to reasons such as bullying, problems in the family, coping up with a death of someone, etc, when given books, are able to heal faster. If you believe your child is going through as such phase, a book would be the best gift for them where, they can actually forget about the worldly problems and indulge themselves in something far more happy and satisfying.

The books can be comics, great inspiring stories, novels of fiction or autobiographies.

Reading time is a bonding time

Reading time is a bonding time

“Reading aloud with children is known to be the single most important activity for building the knowledge and skills they will eventually require for learning to read.” ~ Marilyn Jager Adams

Not only for the child, but also for the parent. Parents who encourage their children to read in front or with them are building their children’s self-confidence, telling them that it is okay to make mistakes, but it is also important to learn from them. This serves as a great bonding time and makes for some of the most cherished memories for the parent and child.

It develops emotions

It develops emotions

“To read a book for the first time is to make an acquaintance with a new friend; to read it for a second time is to meet an old one.” ~ Chinese Proverb

When you read a book, you are on the receiving end of knowledge. The sender, the writer is delivering a message, imparting something of value, a fact, an opinion, a view or at the very least an emotion. They are inviting you into their own psyche and hoping that you will care enough to listen and respond to it.

So it won’t be wrong to say that reading actually flexes emotions. It builds a connection between the reader and the writer you have never met or known before. Even if you disagree with what they are delivering, you get to know them and you connect to them on an emotional level.

Reading builds independence

Reading builds independence

“I owe everything I am and everything I will ever be to books.” ~ Gary Paulsen

As much as it does to build confidence in kids, reading also makes them independent. When they read, they learn more. When they learn more, they become self-confident and thus don’t feel the urge or need to rely on anyone but themselves. If you, as a parent, are successful in building independent reading ability in your kids, you will see that the child will continue reading because they love it. He will be doing it for the pleasure they get when reading a good book and this friends.

Readers are leaders

Readers are leaders

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.” ~Harry S. Truman

Although not definitively proved, but almost all great leaders were readers. One reason they are respected and known for their wisdom is because they develop a healthy reading habit. For centuries, reading has been the source of inspiration, growth and new ideas. It is a valuable investment in one’s own personality with uncountable and long-lasting benefits. If you want your child to become one, you need to encourage him to read. It will keep his mind healthy and productive. Only then they will be able to impact the world in a better way.

Reading takes you to places you have never been to before

Reading takes you to places you have never been to before

“From your parents you learn love and laughter and how to put one foot before the other. But when books are opened you discover you have wings.” ~ Helen Hayes

True, books give you wings to fly, explore, feel, fall and rise. Life is very predictable entity in the sense that no one’s getting out alive! But when you are surrounded by books, you get to experience more than just one life. You befriend new people, you idolize them, you think and act like them, and you go wherever they plan on taking you. Children like to relate to people who they love. You may have often heard kids saying, I want to be like my dad when I grow up, which is of course a great thing. As happy as that very moment is, we all secretly wish that our kids grow up to become better versions of ourselves. Give them books to find such personalities that inspire you and have changed the world for better. This can only be attained if you give them the gift of good books.

Reading makes kids socially likable and acceptable

Reading makes kids socially likable and acceptable

“He that loves reading has everything within his reach.” ~ William Godwin

Reading is seen as a likeable trait in our society. Think about it; you see someone on a train with a book in their hands and you automatically assume they are smarter and know more than you do. Kids who tend to read more instead of just watching TV or playing life-consuming video games are believed to be more intelligent from a common man’s perspective. This one trait helps children bond well in groups, express their feelings and views better, and are often chosen to be leaders because they are perceived to know better and respected for that.

Books have the power to change your life

Books have the power to change your life

“Books can be dangerous. The best ones should be labeled “This could change your life.” ~ Helen Exley

We often hear people say that a certain book completely changed their lives, or at least the way they viewed the world and all the people in it before reading it. Is it just a cliché, or are books really that powerful?

Yes they are, but in what way?

When you read the right book at the right time, it does more than tell you a story or give you information. It alters your perspective. Books change lives.

Reading teaches humility

Reading teaches humility

One of the greatest benefits of reading is that, once you read it, be it any book, it will teach you something. You learn humility by giving the book a chance to teach you something. You stay patient and read, and once you embrace whatever the writer is trying to teach you, your humility further deepens. You realize that, before reading the book, you had very limited knowledge and understand that there is still so much out there that you don’t know of. This feeling of knowing that the world doesn’t revolve around you alone builds empathy and humility in children, which is a great attribute to foster.

Reading is fun!

Reading is fun!

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.” ~ Groucho Marx

It truly is, and all those who don’t agree, don’t know of the pleasures of reading. Read, read, and then read some more. Embrace all the knowledge that you can and cultivate the same habits in your children from an early age. Kids are active observers. They learn what they see and hear. If they see that you enjoy reading, one day, they will too.

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Now that you know of the importance of reading and how great an impact reading can have on the life of your child, it is time you learn how to encourage this habit in them from an early stage:

  • 1. Start with colorful books and magazines with lots of pictures so that your kids may find them appealing.
  • 2. Introduce bookmarks to them.
  • 3. Gift them books on special occasions like Christmas or their birthday.
  • 4. If your budget allows, build them their very own bookshelf where they can keep all their books.
  • 5. Read aloud to your children and encourage the same in them to do.
  • 6. Not all reading should be in the covers of books. Introduce them to billboards, safety signs, knowledge-related games such as spelling bee, and the like.
  • 7. Present reading as an activity your kids witness you doing in your spare time.

Reading has a tremendous effect in fueling all aspects of our personality and enhancing our linguistic prowess. In fact, it wouldn’t be wrong to say that the entirety of human life depends on it. Whatever we grow up to become in our lives, no matter where we stand, reading has somehow shaped it.

Until next time; we’ll leave you with something from Carl Sagan:

“A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called “leaves”) imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break the shackles of time—proof that humans can work magic.”

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