The Constantine Affliction – Book Review

T. Aaron Payton is known to creep around in the shadows of libraries and bookstores in his quest to find hidden antiques, but the darkness must have rubbed off on his subconscious because the novels he produces don’t belong in the light. Although he comes from the sunny state of California, The Constantine Affliction is set in London, England. Unfortunately it’s not the pleasant London you might know, and it has nothing to do with the fact it’s set in 1864.

The Constantine Affliction is bringing the city to its knees, and if it’s not killing the citizens they’re being transformed into the opposite sex. Marvelous and disastrous scientific things are taking place, but Pembroke Hanover is an aristocrat with a love of criminology doing everything he can to help when he is sober enough. Along with a curious journalist, Ellie Skyler, they set out to get to the bottom of things while coming across powerful enemies you wouldn’t expect along the way.

The Constantine Affliction is one of the strangest novels you’ll read, but only because of the weird things you’ll hear about. The story is interesting and will keep you engaged as you progress through the book. It starts off as any detective novel would, but doesn’t take long until you know you’re in for a lot of surprises. As soon as you’ve finished you will be desperate to read more books in the series as they become available.

It’s also a great read for anyone who loves history, because it’s set in the olden days long before you were ever born. Without spoiling the story, it makes you think long and hard about what the world would be like if certain things played out differently. You might also begin to wonder what the future will be like for generations to come because of the actions and inactions we’re taking at this moment in time. Do you think some of the things in the novel could ever become part of reality if we go down the wrong path?

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REVIEW OVERVIEW
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