A Conversation with Michael Deeze Author of Bless Me Father

  • People believe that being a published author is glamorous, is that true?
    • If that’s true then nobody told me.  Writing is hard work.  So is laying sod or roofing a house.  Being published is just the end of a journey.  I write because that is what I am compelled to do.  It’s both humbling and gratifying that people like what I do, but the if that was the only reason I did it I would find another job.  The joy is in the finished product for me.
  • Another misconception is that all writers are independently wealthy, how true is that?
    • I still get up and go to my day job every day because I have to.
  • So you have a day job other than being a writer? Do you like it? 
    • I love my job!  I have been lucky enough to be a practicing physician for 35 years.
  • Does your day job ever get in the way of your writing?
    • Quite the contrary.  Doing what I do every day, working with countless unique individuals constantly provides me with differing opinions and viewpoints that help me look at my writing in a much more 3-dimensional way.
  • How realistic are your books? 
    • One of the hardest things when writing for me is to make sure that the story paints a realistic picture.  The descriptions and accounts should be easily visualized by the reader.  If I get too focused on trying to make a scene interested it would be easy to slide into hyperbole which in the long run is hard to maintain and makes the whole section hard to believe in my opinion.  So what I write is real to the best of my knowledge.
  • How much of yourself do you put into your books?
    • Unlike some writers I can’t just pull stories out of thin air.  At this point in my career it is easier and more realistic to use locations and events that I have witnessed first hand and to place characters within them.  Occasionally, it is also easier to use my personal impression of an event to expand on the realism.  All of my stories are written from a first person perspective.
  • Can you tell us about your current projects?
    • A three part trilogy of the journey from child to man to father.  The first now published, Bless Me Father, the second scheduled for release around the holidays, For I Have Sinned, and a third ready for next year release, The Heretic, chronicles one man’s struggle to love himself as he struggles to learn what it means to be a man of integrity while at the same time fighting his inner demons.
  • Is there anything you are currently working on that may intrigue the interest of your readers?
    • Bless Me Father is the first full length novel in what will be a three part saga.  The second in the series, For I Have Sinned, is in the works and carries the journey of both the son and the father, both damaged by their own wartime experiences, both afflicted with PTSD as a result.  They begin to see their own reflection in the other while they search for their own personal forgiveness and redemption.  The second book takes you forward as the two struggle toward personal acceptance and strive to understand the other.
  • People believe that being a published author is glamorous, is that true?
    • If that’s true then nobody told me.  Writing is hard work.  So is laying sod or roofing a house.  Being published is just the end of a journey.  I write because that is what I am compelled to do.  It’s both humbling and gratifying that people like what I do, but the if that was the only reason I did it I would find another job.  The joy is in the finished product for me.
  • Another misconception is that all writers are independently wealthy, how true is that?
    • I still get up and go to my day job every day because I have to.
  • So you have a day job other than being a writer? Do you like it? 
    • I love my job!  I have been lucky enough to be a practicing physician for 35 years.
  • Does your day job ever get in the way of your writing?
    • Quite the contrary.  Doing what I do every day, working with countless unique individuals constantly provides me with differing opinions and viewpoints that help me look at my writing in a much more 3-dimensional way.
  • How realistic are your books? 
    • One of the hardest things when writing for me is to make sure that the story paints a realistic picture.  The descriptions and accounts should be easily visualized by the reader.  If I get too focused on trying to make a scene interested it would be easy to slide into hyperbole which in the long run is hard to maintain and makes the whole section hard to believe in my opinion.  So what I write is real to the best of my knowledge.
  • How much of yourself do you put into your books?
    • Unlike some writers I can’t just pull stories out of thin air.  At this point in my career it is easier and more realistic to use locations and events that I have witnessed first hand and to place characters within them.  Occasionally, it is also easier to use my personal impression of an event to expand on the realism.  All of my stories are written from a first person perspective.
  • Can you tell us about your current projects?
    • A three part trilogy of the journey from child to man to father.  The first now published, Bless Me Father, the second scheduled for release around the holidays, For I Have Sinned, and a third ready for next year release, The Heretic, chronicles one man’s struggle to love himself as he struggles to learn what it means to be a man of integrity while at the same time fighting his inner demons.
  • Is there anything you are currently working on that may intrigue the interest of your readers?
    • Bless Me Father is the first full length novel in what will be a three part saga.  The second in the series, For I Have Sinned, is in the works and carries the journey of both the son and the father, both damaged by their own wartime experiences, both afflicted with PTSD as a result.  They begin to see their own reflection in the other while they search for their own personal forgiveness and redemption.  The second book takes you forward as the two struggle toward personal acceptance and strive to understand the other.
  • Have you received any awards for your literary works?
  • I was recently named one of the “Most Exciting Independent Writers for 2018” by Indie Authors Magazine for some short stories that I wrote.
  • Do you think you still have a story to tell to the readers?
    • Absolutely! Writing is fun as long as there is a story to tell.  Telling stories is an artform that I watched my uncles perform as a child.  Being a good story teller is essential if you are going to teach and I use it constantly in my medical practice as a way of interesting patients enough so that they would listen to my advice.  I love telling stories.
  • Do your novels carry a message?
    • All good stories have a message in them.  Some smack you in the face and some get you to thinking.  In my novels the characters all seek to win the inner struggle between what they want, what they have and who they are.  Most people experience the same struggle but rarely is it on the surface of their conscious thought.  Inner emotional conflict and general dissatisfaction are the end-products of this and it is reflected in how compelled we as a society strive to fill our lives with more toys, bigger houses and more money in order to achieve satisfaction.  To bring that level of introspection to the surface would be the greatest achievement that I could hope for, even if only for a few.
  • Do you believe you have done enough to leave a legacy behind?
    • When my father was near the end of his life he presented me with a diary that he had kept of his wartime experiences.  His war experience was something he would never speak of while we were growing up.  The details were horrific, and it gave me a perspective of a different man.  This diary gave me the impetus to chronicle some of my own young life so that I might, someday, share it with my own sons.  As I began to write the story of another man began to emerge and it intertwined with my own.  My books are my legacy and my gift to my children.
  • If you were given a teaching opportunity, would you accept it?
    • In a heartbeat.  There is such a rift between someone who can teach the facts of a subject and a true teacher that can teach the substance of it.  In my life I have watched as schools turn out people who know their subject well but can’t use it for critical thinking.  I would love the opportunity to try and show that there is another way to look at even the simplest of subjects so that it could come to life for them.
  • Have any of your past loves inspired characters in your books?
    • All of them.  The good ones and the bad ones.  The ones that made my soul dance and sing, and the one that showed me how deep the depth of sorrow and heartbreak truly can be.
  • You don’t have to be a writer in order to be an author – how true is that?
  • I would say that is absolutely true. It’s evidenced by the amount of crap that gets published every day.  Most of the stuff that is being published today might have been a good book or story if the person had taken more time to embrace being a writer and less time in a headlong rush to become an A
  • Do you prefer being intoxicated to write? Or would you rather write sober?
    • “Write drunk, edit sober is a quote often attributed to Hemingway, but it’s doubtful he ever said it.  I don’t either, but I will admit that it occasionally will stir a memory that helps in particular circumstances.
  • How big of a part does music play in creating your “zone”?
    • I don’t think I could write if I couldn’t listen to music. I listen to different genres depending on the scenes or emotions that I’m looking for.

 

 

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